This Time I Had To Take a Deep Breath And Remind Myself

that I am not part of some monolith

For President Trump the in defense of the indefensible seems to be working for him. The support of minorities highlighted and emphasized at the latest Trump rally is the defendants’ proof supposedly offered as evidence that Trump is not a racist. As disappointing as this may be for me to observe such absurdity I couldn’t help but feel a sense of defeatism in the fracturing of the unique bond that a multiracial collective should share under the circumstances. Certainly, there are non white people who support the racializations that Trump and his administration proffers. No one disputes that. But what this really disproves is that any race is monolithic in their attitudes, beliefs and behaviors. What this exercise in Trumpism absolutely proves is this one thing that is majorly overlooked, undermined, independent of race, but is absolutely monolithic… 😐😑😐 stupidity.

These are Cipolla’s five fundamental laws of stupidity:

  1. Always and inevitably everyone underestimates the number of stupid individuals in circulation.
  2. The probability that a certain person (will) be stupid is independent of any other characteristic of that person.
  3. A stupid person is a person who causes losses to another person or to a group of persons while himself deriving no gain and even possibly incurring losses.
  4. Non-stupid people always underestimate the damaging power of stupid individuals. In particular non-stupid people constantly forget that at all times and places and under any circumstances to deal and/or associate with stupid people always turns out to be a costly mistake.
  5. A stupid person is the most dangerous type of person.

Corollary: a stupid person is more dangerous than a pillager.

As is evident from the third law, Cipolla identifies two factors to consider when exploring human behaviour:

The few black Trump supporters here hold up “Trump and Republicans Are Not Racist” t-shirts and the crowd goes wild as Andrea Bocelli’s “Time To Say Goodbye” blares from the arena loudspeakers #Cincinnati pic.twitter.com/0edBWleLtg

— Christopher Mathias (@letsgomathias) August 1, 2019

The fly in the ointment or the minorities at Trump rallies are supposed to allow for this skepticism that either confounds and distorts judgement on what has been made blatantly clear of Trump’s racism. If anything it accentuates the stupidity of racism and its adherents. This racialization and its assimilations plays into the racial hierarchical socialization that Trump’s majority support enjoys as privilege and entitlement at the detriment of others. This is epic deindividuation on display.

It is also predicated on a rallying point against democratic congresswoman Rep. Illhan Omar of Minnesota and the stance that she be sent back. Rep. Ocasio-Cortez, Rep. Ayanna Pressley, and Rep. Rashida Tlaib are also targets of a threat of being sent back — and the where, the why, and the how they are to be sent back is also disconcertingly irrational. While none of these Trump supporters have made the rational connection that those remarks are not only just lacking basis and utterly cruel they fail to see how this is antithetical to the essence of being American — like themselves and is a crucial aspect of precedence in how democracy in and of itself works.

Generally speaking, if any ideologue, charlatan, or authoritarian is able to get a sizeable amount of people to go against their own interests or better judgement to further that of the charlatan’s own interests — increasing their own influence into power, it is always haphazardly seen as genius. Motivated ignorance is never in short supply, so the ease to which this is done is not all that impressive.

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This awful emotive that is this negatively unwelcoming sentiment in this instance is incredibly shallow in its thinking. This is similar to how a bully can corral a herd mentality by giving a false sense of belonging or to being on the right side — no pun intended of a fight perceived as unwinnable from the side claiming to have already won.

All of this has nothing to do with our more positive trait of togetherness, which is something that seemingly and interestingly is not enjoyed as much as our divisiveness is. 🧐 Which brings me to why those captions of, or semblances of minorities supporting Trump’s racism are so emphasized in the way that they are. This is suppose to reinforce the effectiveness of status quo — marginalization and oppression — or mob rule. Or simply just the vast ubiquitousness of stupidity. I say its both.

The ability to get a few of those minorities to go against their own interests and own better judgment is key to the acculturation it proffers which psychologically differs for that of the non minority. Clearly under the “send them back” mantra, they get to dictate who they feel comfortable with or who they perceive as acting in accordance with and thus determine what a real American is and is not. That logic seems to condescend to the uninformed premise and mindset of who is really getting to make that sort of racist ill-advised decision. Joining them encourages and inspires this placating effect further and subjugates minorities as a whole to pledge their worth as 2nd class citizens under this strange deleterious allegiance. It has cherry picking connotations that makes those who were born here, and for those were not born here (but are U.S. citizens) subject to more nuanced discriminations, biases and prejudices simply if they do not align with the interests and or stereotyping of this herd mentality.

When I asked Roseanna and Amy whether they would join in a “Send her back!” chant were it to take place that night, both women said no, but out of deference to Trump. “He apologized for that, so I think us as Trump supporters will respect him for that,” Roseanna said. She then shared her thoughts on the chant’s target, Representative Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, who came to America as a refugee from Somalia.

“Look, but she is gonna get — you know, I don’t want her stinkin’ Muslim crap in my country,” Roseanna said.

“Sharia law,” Amy chimed in. Her iridescent CoverGirl highlighter glinted under the stadium lights. “Sharia law.”

“That’s not America,” Roseanna said. “She is a Muslim through and through …She wants that all here.” She wondered aloud whether Omar had come to the U.S. illegally. (There is no evidence this is true.)

Never underestimate the dimension of irreflective thought processes and irrationality stemming from stupidity. They sort of lavish in the fact that they are in fact stupid and devolve in a sort of prideful display. Stupidity heavily relies on stereotyping and unfounded dislike for misunderstood concepts related to their own interconnectedness to humanity.

This conspired stereotyping extends over to the charitable whiteness on display by Trump especially in regards to this problematic nonsense here.

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credit Ethan

Again, reminding myself that my blackness is absolutely not monolithic. Trump assumes that this is a good look for him because he is seen as publicly defending the steretypical behaviors of this African American celebrity overseas. This should in his mind result in more African American acquiescence or votes of confidence in the illusion that he presents as not at all racist. 🤨 Right! Since Blacks were already presumed to be prone to violence it has behooved Trump under the authority invested in him to now want to shoulder some empathy towards humanitarianism in this reality White House episode.

The Trump campaign, in another effort to shake the racist label, has developed a talking point: liberals are just abusing the term “racist” as a cheap way to score political points.

“Using racism has become the easy button of left-wing politics,” Donald Trump Jr., the president’s son, told the crowd before his father took the stage in Cincinnati. Sure, racism is “still an issue,“ Trump Jr. argued, but liberals make a “mockery” of the term by using it too much.

The president used his own speech to once again degrade Baltimore, and then insult other “inner-city” communities that have Democratic representation in Congress. “We can name one after another, but I won’t do that because I don’t want to be controversial,” the president said to laughs. “We want no controversy.”

As for the four congresswomen Trump told to “go back” to their own countries, the president didn’t name any of them Thursday night, but did he did call them “left-wing extremists who reject everything that we hold dear.”

Calling out racism as it happens and where it exists is a reaction to an offense that is acutely defined and matter-of-factly committed or occurring in real-time. The perceived overuse (racism) of which is actually in direct proportion to the regularity of how and when it is carried out. It is not a liberal talking point nor is it at all political. It is a recurring societal ill.

As speakers mounted their defenses of the president, it seemed apparent that supporters were cheering them on as a means of affirming not just Trump, but also themselves. Because to accuse a politician of holding virulent racist beliefs is also, if only implicitly, to condemn his or her voters of harboring those same tendencies.

And that’s what the rally-goers I spoke to last night seemed most nonplussed by — not so much that Trump had been roundly condemned in recent days as a racist, or a bigot, but that they, by virtue of association, had been as well. But rather than distancing them from Trump, the accusations have only seemed to strengthen their support of this president. To back down, they suggested, would be to bow down to the scourge of political correctness.

The controversy that Trump employs to his popularity is absurdly beneficial due to the preponderance of stupidity. It can all be easily excused away as politics but the fact remains that this administration has done nothing to address it nor dismantle it, only stoke it. It has embraced it actually much to the resistance and discord it increasingly creates to burn him (that’s where the huge loss to him lies).

Allie Salerno, a retired schoolteacher from Cincinnati wearing a “Women For Trump” T-shirt, told HuffPost she thought liberals had “devalued the use of the word ‘racist.’ What a horrible accusation. What a terrible thing to say to someone. To call everybody a racist. We’ve been called racist. Why?”

Salerno said it was in no way bigoted for people to chant “send her back!” about Rep. Omar. “She’s a migrant,” Salerno said. “She’s from Somalia. That doesn’t mean she’s American. She was not born here.” (Omar is a U.S citizen.)

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When you don’t even know why you are being called out for racism it suggests that the dangers of motivated ignorance and insensitive beliefs have benefits that blinds, which has many of them mired in perpetuating a lack of awareness that is their very own loss.

It appears the more that I write the better I perceive.

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